Sensory Toys

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Sensory Toys

A sensory toy is specially designed to stimulate the development, of the five human senses: sight, sound, touch, smell, and tasteThese sensory toys are meant to help children develop their senses in a safe and natural environment using play. Sensorial toys include elements such as bright, contrasting colors, different textures, sounds, etc.

Playing with sensory material

Treatment for sensory information processing problems is usually done by occupational therapists specialized in SI (sensory information processing problems). An occupational therapist visits the child at home and/or at school and helps the child to cope with the sensory challenges.

Music therapy

When a child is sensitive to sound, music therapy can be used. Music tracks with high pitches are designed to re-train the brain to hear sound correctly. It is a slow process and can be difficult at first, but the benefits can be life-changing.

Toys with sound

Toys that make soft sounds can also help. Think, for example, of the rainmaker.

Audiologists have a similar approach to treating hyperacusis in their hospitals, which involves a type of noise therapy (a device similar to a hearing aid that emits different pitches into the child's ear, ultimately 'restarting' the brain's auditory processing).

Playing with sensory stimuli: lighting, sound, sand, foam, etc.

Children with tactile defenses may benefit from toys that allow the child to explore different textures in a playful way. These include play materials such as clay, putty, finger paints, play sand, Mad Mattr, or Happy Senso foam. But also games and materials in combination with water can help to create tolerance for different textures. It is important to build up carefully, starting with dry textures and extending to more sticky substances such as slime.

Colourful toys

Toys with bright, colorful, and contrasting patterns can stimulate children with visual processing disorders in their visual development.